Wray Crescent Pavilion Meeting
Thu 07-Sep-2017 7pm
 

We're organising a meeting of members to try and work out a plan for replacing changing rooms at Wray Crescent (where the infamous concrete 'Pavilibunker' was condemned pre-season), in light of possible funding help from the ECB, possible funds available from the council and other fundraising and council lobbying that might be done. Any members (or friends of the club) local to the ground or who has some expertise or passion around any other aspects (campaigning and lobbying, fundraising, pitching for funds, etc) - we'd welcome your suppport. 

Here's a summary of how we got to where we are:

June 2017: Islington Council meeting re Wray Crescent, attended on behalf of the club by Pete. 

April 2017: Letter fron Islington Council: "We have been monitoring the status of the pavilion for some time now. Prior to the new season it was noted from observing the crack monitors that the building seemed to be deteriorating. We felt it was necessary to have a structural engineer review the building before the season and unfortunately they concluded that the building was no longer structurally sound and not safe for the public to enter. We then e-mailed all users of the facility to give them notice that they would not be able to use the pavilion..." Read more here.

2015: Council erects huge nets at Wray after some homeowner complained about cricket balls endangering his car, even though he knowingly bought a house right by a cricket pitch.
2014: Two articles in The Guardian about the woes at Wray:
- The first by Andy Bull: "Word from the wilds of north London reaches the Spin that Sunday cricket at Wray Crescent, the only pitch in the entirety of Islington, has been cancelled for the foreseeable future because of an ongoing conflict between the cricketers and a group of casual footballers. The muddied oafs have been refusing to cede ground to the flannelled fools. They want the outfield for their kickabouts, though the cricketers have booked the pitch many months in advance. Requests, polite and otherwise, for the footballers to give ground have led, it's said, to 'some extremely heated confrontations' between the two groups." Later in 2014 the council responded, saying, among other things: "the pitch at Wray Crescent is still primarily a cricket facility and the council have no desire to change that. However like all facilities in the borough there is a high demand for their use. Islington has the smallest amount of open space of any London borough and the spaces such as Wray Crescent are valuable to the wider community. We also therefore need to be pragmatic and realistic that other groups are going to use this space when it is not being used for cricket"... 
The second article by Toby: "On a summer's day Wray Crescent can be a lovely place to play, shielded from the wind by a ring of trees and houses, and our games have drawn a growing band of cricket enthusiasts to spectate. Of course, such urban cricket is not without its problems…"